Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS)

Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), or ‘cot death’, is a form of sudden unexpected infant death (SUID) which involves the sudden and unexplained death of a seemingly healthy infant. This usually involves infants below the age of one year (most commonly below six months) and more often than not occurs while they are asleep. According…

Endometriosis

The inner lining of the uterus that is shed during menstruation every month is known as endometrium and the tissue present on this inner wall is called endometrial tissue. Endometriosis refers to the abnormal growth of endometrial tissue in areas outside of the uterus. This may manifest in different parts of the abdomen including: ovaries…

Crohn’s Disease

Crohn’s disease is a form of chronic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that prevails at one or more locations along the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. It affects both males and females equally, and is more prevalent in developed countries, Europe and North America than in other parts of the world. Patients with the disease may experience intermittent…

What is Chemotherapy?

In a strict sense, ‘chemotherapy’ refers to the use of chemical drugs to treat any given illness. However, it is most commonly and almost solely used with reference to the use of drugs in the treatment of cancer, which is what this article focuses on. Contrary to surgery and radiation therapy, both of which target…

Urticaria (Hives)

Urticaria, or hives, is a condition that affects up to 20% of the population at least once in their lifetime. While the source of the condition is immunology-related, it is often categorised as a dermatological condition due to its manifestation as small, pink/red, itchy bumps (welts) on the skin. They may occur on any part…

Cataract

Cataract refers to the condition where the lens of the eye – a transparent, biconvex structure behind the iris that focuses light onto the retina so that we see things as they are – develops cloudy patches. These patches usually increase in area over time, subsequently affecting one’s vision. Cataract may develop in only one…

Leprosy (Hansen’s Disease)

Leprosy (or Hansen’s Disease) is a communicable, infectious disease that has, over centuries, been associated with continued social stigma. In ancient times, it was believed to be some form of divine “punishment”, while in more recent history it was thought to cause “limbs to fall off” of affected individuals. In this article, we delve into…

What’s in an FBC?

Every now and then, a doctor may prescribe you to have a full blood count, or FBC, (sometimes referred to as complete blood count, CBC) test done. This is usually carried out as part of the screening process to make a diagnosis, or may also be carried out as a routine check-up or to monitor…

Diabetes Mellitus (Type 1 and Type 2)

Diabetes mellitus, commonly referred to as diabetes, is a metabolic disorder that results in constantly elevated blood glucose levels (hyperglycaemia). Our blood glucose levels are usually regulated by insulin, a hormone secreted by the pancreas in response to elevated blood glucose levels. Insulin facilitates the absorption of excess glucose in blood circulation into liver, fat…

Essential Tremor

Essential tremor is a neurological disorder that affects about 5% of the world’s population. It is also sometimes referred to as ‘familial tremor’ due to its tendency to run in families. Essential tremor is the most commonly occurring tremor disorder and is often confused with Parkinson’s disease due to the involuntary rhythmic shaking that both…